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This Tuesday (26), customers of the internet service Verizon Fios, in the United States, suffered from irregular operation to access and load pages. Around 13 pm (Brasília time), users started reporting the instability in the Downdetector.

According to reports from users starting school and work hours, the problems also limited download and upload speeds. In this way, users were unable to access Verizon's own services, Amazon Web Services, and communication and collaborative work tools such as Google, Slack, Zoom and others.

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On the other hand, despite complaints about individual services, the problem seems to have been concentrated in the regions affected by the interruption of Verizon Fios' service. On the AWS status pages, for example, the company cited having identified “connectivity problems with an internet provider”, that is, an external agent.

Also on its status page, the Slack confirmed to be aware of the issues that affected a limited number of users. "We are aware of and monitoring an internet service issue that could affect the connection of East Coast users and the ability to use Slack," said the company.

Online classes offline

According to the company's support team at Twitter, a fiber cut in the Brooklyn area of ​​New York, may be responsible for the problem. Verizon has informed customers that it is investigating the case, as well as the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

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In the Downdetector, there was a peak of more than 22 thousand affected users. Verizon reported that the Northeast and East Coast regions of the United States were the most affected. According to the company's support, the problem seems to have been solved around 17 pm (Brasília time).

As reported by The Washington Post, the problems did not only affect individuals and companies. Public schools in Fairfax and Prince William Counties, Virginia, reported that students were unable to access virtual classes. School officials also had connectivity problems during the day.

Street: The Washington Post